The Scientist

» evolution, ecology and developmental biology

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image: Icy Algae in a Changing Arctic

Icy Algae in a Changing Arctic

By | February 14, 2013

New research adds to an emerging picture of the changes that global warming and thinning ice are wreaking on the marine ecosystems at the top of the world.


image: Sampling the New Arctic

Sampling the New Arctic

By | February 14, 2013

Scenes from a research trip, where researchers peered beneath the ice to shine a light on the emerging picture of a changing Arctic Ocean


image: Diversity Defeats Disease

Diversity Defeats Disease

By | February 13, 2013

In a pond, more amphibian species mean decreased chances of disease spread.


image: Placental Ancestor Found

Placental Ancestor Found

By | February 11, 2013

A small insect-eating animal is the common ancestor of whales, elephants, dogs, and humans.


image: Oil Additive Harming Seabirds

Oil Additive Harming Seabirds

By | February 8, 2013

Scientists have identified the sticky substance that is damaging the feathers of hundreds seabirds washed ashore in England as an additive for lubricant oils.  


image: Opinion: Paradoxical Amphibians

Opinion: Paradoxical Amphibians

By | February 7, 2013

New amphibian species are being discovered at an exciting rate, yet they are also the vertebrates most at risk of extinction.


image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Freezing Cells

Freezing Cells

By | February 1, 2013

A handful of species have learned how to survive in freezing climates. To do so, the animals must counteract the damaging effects of ice crystal formation, or keep from freezing altogether. Here are a few ways they do it.

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image: Frogcicle


By | February 1, 2013

Watch as the astounding wood frog uses cellular cryopreservation tricks to freeze, thaw, and live to croak about it.


image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.



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