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image: Unexpectedly Wild

Unexpectedly Wild

By | September 1, 2015

Genomic analysis reveals pigs interbred with wild boars during domestication.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2015

Brain Storms, Orphan, Maize for the Gods, and Paranoid.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

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image: Hear and Now

Hear and Now

By | September 1, 2015

Auditory research advances worth shouting about

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Aural History

Aural History

By | September 1, 2015

The form and function of the ears of modern land vertebrates cannot be understood without knowing how they evolved.

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image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

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image: Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

By , , and | August 26, 2015

The use of targetable chromatin modifiers has ushered in a new era of functional epigenomics.

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image: Alphabet Announces Life Sciences

Alphabet Announces Life Sciences

By | August 24, 2015

Google’s parent company is launching a research-and-development project as a standalone firm.

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