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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | April 1, 2017

Eugene Garfield, the cancer moonshot, employee genetic testing, and more

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image: San People Write Ethical Code for Research

San People Write Ethical Code for Research

By | March 21, 2017

With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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An ingestible, electronic capsule can harvest energy from stomach acid for up to a week in a pig model system.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

image: Next Generation: Biocompatible Microdevices

Next Generation: Biocompatible Microdevices

By | January 6, 2017

A new fabrication strategy enables scientists to manufacture fully biocompatible, implantable medical devices. 

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