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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | May 13, 2016

US government contemplates public health funding; World Health Organization advises summer Olympics attendees

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image: CDC: Screen Pee for Zika, Too

CDC: Screen Pee for Zika, Too

By | May 11, 2016

Health officials say testing urine as well as blood samples can provide a more accurate diagnosis than screening blood alone.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

By | May 9, 2016

The proteins could be the key to stopping the transmissible facial tumor disease that is threatening the species.

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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: CDC: Zika Causes Microcephaly

CDC: Zika Causes Microcephaly

By | April 14, 2016

The virus is also to blame for other birth defects, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concludes.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: Mosquito Control, 1945

Mosquito Control, 1945

By | April 1, 2016

Long before Zika’s expected arrival, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were a focus of public health campaigns in the U.S. 

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