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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Polio Reemerges in Nigeria

Polio Reemerges in Nigeria

By | August 15, 2016

Prior to last week’s announcement of newly confirmed cases, the country had been polio-free for two years.

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image: Unexplained Zika Case in Utah

Unexplained Zika Case in Utah

By | July 18, 2016

Health officials are investigating a case of Zika infection in a patient who acquired the virus while caring for an infected relative who died this month.

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People returning from the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil will not substantially affect viral transmission in most participating countries, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | May 13, 2016

US government contemplates public health funding; World Health Organization advises summer Olympics attendees

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image: CDC: Screen Pee for Zika, Too

CDC: Screen Pee for Zika, Too

By | May 11, 2016

Health officials say testing urine as well as blood samples can provide a more accurate diagnosis than screening blood alone.

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