The Scientist

» diet and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

By | January 13, 2016

A low-fiber diet decimated the diversity of bacterial species in mice colonized with human gut microbes in a recent study.

0 Comments

image: Controlling Cravings

Controlling Cravings

By | December 29, 2015

A hormone made in the liver controls how much sugar mice eat, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

0 Comments

image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

0 Comments

image: Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

By | November 23, 2015

Researchers should pay closer attention to the diets they use to study obesity in mice, experts advise.

6 Comments

image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

0 Comments

image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

0 Comments

image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

0 Comments

image: Leibel on Diets

Leibel on Diets

By | November 1, 2015

Columbia University researcher Rudy Leibel discusses a study that found benefit in a high-fat diet.

1 Comment

image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  2. Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?
  3. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
  4. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
RayBiotech