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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice

Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice

By | January 7, 2014

Scientists show that fiber’s influence on gut microbes affects the lungs’ response to allergens.

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image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Healthy Lifestyle Lengthens Telomeres?

Healthy Lifestyle Lengthens Telomeres?

By | September 18, 2013

Diet, exercise, and stress management may lengthen telomeres, a new study shows, though some scientists are skeptical.

1 Comment

image: Football Losses Tied to Junk Food

Football Losses Tied to Junk Food

By | August 23, 2013

When their local team is defeated, people seem to drown their sorrows in saturated fat, but uplifting thinking can change the bad habit.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

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image: “Safe” Sugar Levels Harm Mice

“Safe” Sugar Levels Harm Mice

By | August 15, 2013

A high-sugar diet comparable to that consumed by up to a quarter of Americans renders mice less able to compete for territory and reproduce.

1 Comment

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