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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Study: Genetic Tests Don’t Change Behavior

Study: Genetic Tests Don’t Change Behavior

By | March 17, 2016

Knowing one’s genetic risk for particular diseases doesn’t encourage behavior modifications, according to a study.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

By | January 13, 2016

A low-fiber diet decimated the diversity of bacterial species in mice colonized with human gut microbes in a recent study.

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image: Controlling Cravings

Controlling Cravings

By | December 29, 2015

A hormone made in the liver controls how much sugar mice eat, according to a study.

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