The Scientist

» diet and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: <em>BRCA1</em> Linked to Brain Size

BRCA1 Linked to Brain Size

By | March 20, 2014

The breast cancer-associated gene may play a protective role in neural stem cells, a mouse study finds.


image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.


image: Neural Target for Autism?

Neural Target for Autism?

By | February 7, 2014

Mouse and rat models of the developmental disorder responded positively to a drug given to their mothers a day before birth.


image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation


image: Fighting Fire with Fire

Fighting Fire with Fire

By | January 30, 2014

Exposing severly allergic children to progressively larger amounts of peanut flour desensitizes them over time, a study shows.


image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.


image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue


image: Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice

Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice

By | January 7, 2014

Scientists show that fiber’s influence on gut microbes affects the lungs’ response to allergens.

1 Comment

image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet
  2. Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes
  3. How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings
  4. Birth of the Skin Microbiome
    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

Life Technologies