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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Resveratrol’s Low-Dose Anticancer Effect

Resveratrol’s Low-Dose Anticancer Effect

By | July 31, 2015

The antioxidant found in red wine and some berries shows that small doses have more potent antitumor effects than large doses in a mouse model.

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image: The Death Toll Tied to Sweet Drinks

The Death Toll Tied to Sweet Drinks

By | July 1, 2015

Annually, about 184,000 deaths annually are linked to drinking sugary beverages, according to a new study.

7 Comments

image: Periodic Fasting Improves Rodent Health

Periodic Fasting Improves Rodent Health

By | June 18, 2015

And a diet that includes a few days of caloric restriction each month reduces biomarkers of aging and disease in people, according to a small trial.

2 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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