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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2014 issue of The Scientist

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image: Digesting Dietary Data

Digesting Dietary Data

By | June 1, 2014

Why are there so many contradictory nutrition studies, and how can they be improved?

4 Comments

image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

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image: Longevity Diet

Longevity Diet

By | June 1, 2014

Researchers unmask a gene that protects C. elegans from lifespan-shrinking metabolic byproducts.

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image: Mutagens and Multivitamins

Mutagens and Multivitamins

By | June 1, 2014

Not one to shy away from controversy, Bruce Ames has pitted himself against industry groups, environmentalists, and his peers through his work identifying DNA mutagens. And he’s not done yet.

7 Comments

image: Nutrient-Sensing Neurons

Nutrient-Sensing Neurons

By | June 1, 2014

Using just three dopaminergic neurons, Drosophila larvae can sense whether a food source lacks a full roster of essential amino acids.

1 Comment

image: For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

By | May 29, 2014

Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.

2 Comments

image: Top 10 New Species

Top 10 New Species

By | May 23, 2014

The International Institute for Species Exploration announces its picks of novel species discovered in the past year, including a carnivorous mammal, a tiny shrimp, and a fungus.

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image: Back from the Blacklist?

Back from the Blacklist?

By | May 8, 2014

Disgraced psychology researcher Marc Hauser, who was found guilty of data fabrication and falsification during his time at Harvard, publishes two new papers.

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