The Scientist

» diet and genetics & genomics

Most Recent

image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

0 Comments

image: Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

By | November 23, 2015

Researchers should pay closer attention to the diets they use to study obesity in mice, experts advise.

6 Comments

image: Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

By | November 19, 2015

The ancient genomes of 50,000-year-old Denisovan teeth suggest the extinct species lived alongside Neanderthals and modern humans.

0 Comments

image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.

0 Comments

image: Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

By | November 16, 2015

Researchers decode mitochondrial DNA from the 500-year-old remains of a native South American child, revealing a new line of maternal ancestors.

0 Comments

image: Three Origins for Rice?

Three Origins for Rice?

By | November 3, 2015

Rice was domesticated three separate times across Asia, a new study suggests.

0 Comments

image: Allele Linked to Obesity in People

Allele Linked to Obesity in People

By | November 3, 2015

A single nucleotide polymorphism in BDNF is tied with lower levels of the protein and higher body-mass index.

0 Comments

image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

0 Comments

image: Leibel on Diets

Leibel on Diets

By | November 1, 2015

Columbia University researcher Rudy Leibel discusses a study that found benefit in a high-fat diet.

1 Comment

image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS