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image: Controlling Cravings

Controlling Cravings

By | December 29, 2015

A hormone made in the liver controls how much sugar mice eat, according to a study.

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image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

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image: Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

By | November 23, 2015

Researchers should pay closer attention to the diets they use to study obesity in mice, experts advise.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Leibel on Diets

Leibel on Diets

By | November 1, 2015

Columbia University researcher Rudy Leibel discusses a study that found benefit in a high-fat diet.

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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Antioxidants May Aid Cancer

Antioxidants May Aid Cancer

By | October 16, 2015

Mice given a dietary supplement had faster-progressing melanoma, a study shows.

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image: Warming Up to Brown Fat

Warming Up to Brown Fat

By | October 8, 2015

Scientists know how to turn on these fat-combusting cells. Can these energy burners be used to combat obesity?

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image: Burn Victims Produce Brown Fat

Burn Victims Produce Brown Fat

By | August 7, 2015

Following extreme trauma, patients’ adipose samples have revealed—for the first time in humans—that white fat can be converted into energy-burning brown fat.

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image: Resveratrol’s Low-Dose Anticancer Effect

Resveratrol’s Low-Dose Anticancer Effect

By | July 31, 2015

The antioxidant found in red wine and some berries shows that small doses have more potent antitumor effects than large doses in a mouse model.

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