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Spoiler Alert

By | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

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image: Cautious Optimism About ZMapp Trial

Cautious Optimism About ZMapp Trial

By | February 25, 2016

The Ebola drug increased survival in a small study, but the effect was not statistically significant.

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image: Opinion: Why Most TBI Studies Fail

Opinion: Why Most TBI Studies Fail

By | February 24, 2016

Thoughts on how to redesign clinical trials for traumatic brain injury

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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

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image: In Situ Antibodies

In Situ Antibodies

By | February 2, 2016

Compared with systemic injections, localized antibody therapies may be more effective for some indications.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

10 Comments

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