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image: Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

By | May 1, 2015

Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Age: 33

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image: Heart Strings

Heart Strings

By | May 1, 2015

An animated primer on the harvesting, growth, and administration of cardiac cells to heart attack patients

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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image: Defeating the Virus

Defeating the Virus

By | May 1, 2015

Recent discoveries are spurring a renaissance in HIV vaccine research and development.

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image: Hearts on Trial

Hearts on Trial

By | May 1, 2015

As researchers conduct the most rigorous human trials of cardiac cell therapies yet attempted, a clear picture of whether these treatments actually work is imminent.

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image: Eye Stem Cell Therapy Moves Ahead

Eye Stem Cell Therapy Moves Ahead

By | April 30, 2015

Researchers inject retinal support cells derived from human embryonic stem cells into the eyes of four men with macular degeneration, bolstering evidence of the experimental treatment’s safety.

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image: FDA Calls for Data on ALS Drug

FDA Calls for Data on ALS Drug

By | April 21, 2015

In the midst of a debate about an experimental drug’s early approval, the US Food and Drug Administration requests that full trial results be released.

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image: Study: Aspirin Reduces Cancer Risk

Study: Aspirin Reduces Cancer Risk

By | April 20, 2015

The largest and longest study of long-term, regular aspirin use finds that the drug may lead to a modestly reduced risk for some types of gastrointestinal cancers.

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