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image: Right-to-Try Bill Passes the Senate

Right-to-Try Bill Passes the Senate

By | August 4, 2017

The legislation removes restrictions for seriously ill patients to access experimental treatments that have not received FDA approval.

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image: Resistance to HIV Engineered Via CRISPR

Resistance to HIV Engineered Via CRISPR

By | August 3, 2017

Mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells that have an HIV receptor gene, CCR5, disrupted by gene editing allows the animals to ward off HIV infection. 

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image: Opinion: Biobanking Has a Consent Dilemma

Opinion: Biobanking Has a Consent Dilemma

By | July 25, 2017

Is the deep uncertainty surrounding fundamental legal and ethical norms putting biobanks in a precarious position? 

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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In two early trials, vaccines tailored to the mutations in individuals’ cancers appeared to protect 12 of 19 patients against relapse. 

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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A new screening tool flags dozens of papers with potential errors.

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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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