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» clinical trials and ecology

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image: Ozone Defender Dies

Ozone Defender Dies

By | March 13, 2012

Nobel Laureate Sherwood Rowland, who first demonstrated that the ozone layer could be destroyed by chemical pollutants, passes away at age 84.

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image: The Sweet Sounds of Spider Silk

The Sweet Sounds of Spider Silk

By | March 7, 2012

A researcher spins spider silk into violin strings.

4 Comments

image: Antarctic Invasion

Antarctic Invasion

By | March 5, 2012

Invasive species threaten the most pristine place on Earth.

4 Comments

image: What it Takes to Develop Better Drugs for Kids

What it Takes to Develop Better Drugs for Kids

By | March 1, 2012

Over the past 15 years, new laws and regulations in the United States and the European Union have expanded to require the inclusion of pediatric patients in clinical drug trials.  

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Contributors

March 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Are the Kids Alright?

Are the Kids Alright?

By | March 1, 2012

Two key pieces of legislation, enacted to spur drugmakers into testing pharmaceutical products in children, are up for reauthorization in the US Congress this October. Have they done their jobs?

6 Comments

image: Suspected Effects of Vitamin D

Suspected Effects of Vitamin D

By | March 1, 2012

Vitamin D has a variety of actions in the body. It binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which then binds to the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and activates the expression of numerous genes. 

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image: Tricky Trials

Tricky Trials

By | March 1, 2012

Studies on safety, efficacy, or dosing of drugs in children, or on nutritional supplements, are not run-of-the-mill.

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image: One Year On

One Year On

By | March 1, 2012

Some thoughts about the ecological fallout from Fukushima

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image: Vitamin D on Trial

Vitamin D on Trial

By | March 1, 2012

Prevention trials for vitamins and supplements are notoriously difficult, but some researchers aren’t giving up on finding proof that vitamin D helps ward off disease.

52 Comments

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