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image: Clinical Silence

Clinical Silence

By | October 10, 2013

A study has shown that less than half of the outcomes of some clinical trials are publicly available.

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image: Progress for First Malaria Vaccine

Progress for First Malaria Vaccine

By | October 8, 2013

Following successful clinical trials, GlaxoSmithKline says it will submit its malaria vaccine for European regulatory approval.

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image: Criminal Hype

Criminal Hype

By | September 25, 2013

Overstating the benefits of a drug lands a former biotech executive in home detention.

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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

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image: Opinion: How HIV Became Positive

Opinion: How HIV Became Positive

By | September 17, 2013

Immunotherapies, such as the re-engineered T cells that last year saved a 7-year-old girl’s life, continue to show promise as cancer treatments.

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image: Opinion: Translational Research in Crisis

Opinion: Translational Research in Crisis

By | September 10, 2013

Turning discoveries made in academic labs into innovative therapies requires a radically new approach.

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image: Ovarian Cancer Screen Shows Promise

Ovarian Cancer Screen Shows Promise

By | August 27, 2013

A blood test for the protein CA-125, coupled with a vaginal ultrasound, can help detect the difficult-to-spot cancer.

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image: Preliminary Malaria Vaccine Trial a Success

Preliminary Malaria Vaccine Trial a Success

By | August 9, 2013

An intravenous vaccine appears to protect adults from malaria infection in a Phase 1 clinical trial.

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image: Pharma Moves Toward Transparency

Pharma Moves Toward Transparency

By | July 29, 2013

The pharmaceutical industry has agreed to share data from clinical trials with researchers, patients, and the public.

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image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

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