The Scientist

» clinical trials and ecology

Most Recent

image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

0 Comments

image: Another Fatal-Disease Drug in Limbo

Another Fatal-Disease Drug in Limbo

By | April 26, 2016

A federal advisory panel votes against Sarepta Therapeutics’s treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

0 Comments

image: Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

By | April 20, 2016

Contamination concerns at cell therapy and radioactive tracer facilities spur production shutdowns.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

0 Comments

image: Book Review: <em>Personal Trials</em>

Book Review: Personal Trials

By | March 22, 2016

At first blush, do-it-yourself clinical trials seem pointless and reckless. But a deeper truth pervades the research and the patients who drive it forward.

0 Comments

image: Cannabis-Based Drug for Epilepsy

Cannabis-Based Drug for Epilepsy

By | March 14, 2016

A marijuana-derived compound shows continued success in treating children with a rare form of the seizure disorder. 

0 Comments

A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

0 Comments

image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Next Generation: Nanotube Scaffolds Reconnect Spinal Neurons
  2. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  3. Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?
  4. Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome
RayBiotech