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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: Historical Hunts

Historical Hunts

By | January 1, 2017

See images from a century of fur trapping and hunting in the Amazon basin.

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

By | January 1, 2017

An entire industry has sprung up around resurrecting failed drugs and recycling existing compounds for novel indications.

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image: Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

By | January 1, 2017

Novel uses for existing and failed drugs may save companies time and money in bringing new therapeutics to market.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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New approaches to treating cancer have shown great promise, but they also come with serious risks that give us cause for concern.

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image: FDA OKs Clinical Trials of Ecstasy for PTSD

FDA OKs Clinical Trials of Ecstasy for PTSD

By | December 1, 2016

The illicit drug has shown promise in helping people with debilitating post-traumatic stress disorder.

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image: Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

By | December 1, 2016

Researchers discover diverse communities of invertebrates inhabiting the water-filled tracks of elephants in Uganda.

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image: Opinion: Not All Genetic Databases Are Equal

Opinion: Not All Genetic Databases Are Equal

By | December 1, 2016

Sorting out which data sets are clinical-grade is key to helping patients.

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