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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Mining the Outliers

Mining the Outliers

By | April 1, 2015

Even when a clinical trial fails, some patients improve. What can researchers learn from these exceptional responders?

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image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

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image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By | April 1, 2015

Cancer treatment becomes more and more personal.

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image: Tracking Miracles

Tracking Miracles

By | April 1, 2015

A panel of oncologists discusses cases of exceptional responders, or cancer patients whose tumors disappear after a brief period of chemotherapy.

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image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

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