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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

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image: Schizophrenia’s Intricacies

Schizophrenia’s Intricacies

By | January 23, 2014

Two studies provide insight into the genetics of the disorder and show again how complex it is.

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image: Inconsistent Evidence

Inconsistent Evidence

By | January 22, 2014

More than a third of US drug approvals are based on a single large clinical trial, while others require more in-depth study, according to a new report.

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image: Visualizing X Chromosome Inactivation

Visualizing X Chromosome Inactivation

By | January 21, 2014

Researchers develop mouse lines to help them see whether the maternal or paternal X chromosome is inactivated.

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image: Daytime Sleep Alters Human Transcriptome

Daytime Sleep Alters Human Transcriptome

By | January 20, 2014

A mistimed sleep cycle drastically reduces the number of genes that are expressed in a 24-hour rhythm.

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image: Dog-Wolf Split

Dog-Wolf Split

By | January 17, 2014

Yet another genetic study of modern canines, both wild and domestic, supports the notion that humans domesticated dogs before growing crops.

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image: Week in Review: January 13–17

Week in Review: January 13–17

By | January 17, 2014

Debating the origins of placental mammals; H. pylori-human coevolution; ant, bee, and wasp queens emit similar pheromones; profiling protein expression in single cancer cells

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image: Toxin Evolution

Toxin Evolution

By | January 16, 2014

Researchers show that scorpion venom toxins are closely related to defensive proteins from venomous insects.

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image: Next Generation: Cancer Cell Protein Profiling

Next Generation: Cancer Cell Protein Profiling

By | January 15, 2014

Antibody barcoding allows scientists and clinicians to analyze protein expression in small amounts of cancer tissue.

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image: $1,000 Genome at Last?

$1,000 Genome at Last?

By | January 15, 2014

Illumina says its newest sequencing system can churn out whole human genomes for $1,000 apiece.

3 Comments

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