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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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image: Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

By | April 1, 2017

Following a spate of patient deaths in clinical trials testing modified T cells for the treatment of cancer, researchers work to reduce the treatment’s toxicity without sacrificing efficacy.

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Measuring PD-L1 levels was a great start. Now we need to quantify more protein biomarkers, assess the tumor mutational landscape, and examine immune cell signatures, too.

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image: Circadian Rhythms Influence Treatment Effects

Circadian Rhythms Influence Treatment Effects

By | April 1, 2017

Across many diseases, taking medication at specific times of day may make the therapy more effective.

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image: Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and Disease

Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and Disease

By | April 1, 2017

The body's rhythms could affect numerous ailments as well as how people respond to treatments.

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image: UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

By | March 24, 2017

The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

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image: Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

By | March 24, 2017

With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

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