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image: Down and Dirty

Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."

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image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

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image: Stemming the Toxic Tide

Stemming the Toxic Tide

By | September 1, 2012

How to screen for toxicity using stem cells

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image: From Plants and Fungi to Clouds

From Plants and Fungi to Clouds

By | August 31, 2012

Salt compounds produced by plant and fungus species help form organic aerosols that form clouds and produce rain.

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image: Stalking Sharks

Stalking Sharks

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers monitor the movement of the Pacific’s largest predators and share the information with the world in real time.

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image: Stem Cell Research Funding Upheld

Stem Cell Research Funding Upheld

By | August 27, 2012

A US Appeal court rules that the National Institutes of Health is legally allowed to fund human embryonic stem cell research.

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image: Mothers-In-Law and Menopause

Mothers-In-Law and Menopause

By | August 23, 2012

Competition for resources between mothers- and daughters-in-law having children at the same time could have been a driver for the emergence of menopause.

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image: Zoo Virus Swap

Zoo Virus Swap

By | August 17, 2012

A polar bear in a German zoo dies after contracting a virus normally found in zebras.

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image: Embryonic Stem Cells Survive Freezing

Embryonic Stem Cells Survive Freezing

By | August 16, 2012

Even after 18 years of frozen storage, human embryos can still produce viable stem cells for drug screening and biomedical research.

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image: More Mutations in Fukushima Butterflies

More Mutations in Fukushima Butterflies

By | August 15, 2012

Researchers have found an increase in butterflies with unusual wing shapes, legs, and antennae than before the nuclear disaster.

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