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PerkinElmer
PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» biofilm and developmental biology

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image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Next Generation: Regulated Wrinkles

Next Generation: Regulated Wrinkles

By | August 9, 2012

Researchers devise a way to create predictably patterned microwrinkles.

2 Comments

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Nanoparticles Prevent Disease

Nanoparticles Prevent Disease

By | June 22, 2012

Medical devices coated with selenium nanoparticles reduce the growth of a deadly hospital-borne infection.

1 Comment

image: Roundup from Microbiology Meeting

Roundup from Microbiology Meeting

By | June 21, 2012

Some of the interesting stories researchers were discussing at this year’s American Society of Microbiology meeting in San Francisco.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

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