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image: Clinic Trial Problems Kept Mum

Clinic Trial Problems Kept Mum

By | February 11, 2015

Despite documented dysfunction in a number of studies, rarely do those problems get a mention in the resulting publications, according to a new study.

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image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

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image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

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image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

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image: Lazarus Drugs

Lazarus Drugs

By | February 1, 2015

While some drugs sail through development, others suffer setbacks, including FDA rejections, before reaching the market.  

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image: Screening Goes In Silico

Screening Goes In Silico

By | February 1, 2015

Computational tools take some of the cost—and guesswork—out of drug discovery.

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: Thanks for the Memories

Thanks for the Memories

By | February 1, 2015

B and T cells may be the memory masters of the immune system, but research reveals that other cells can be primed by pathogens, too.

1 Comment

image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

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image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  

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