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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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image: Chemistry as Art

Chemistry as Art

By | February 1, 2014

See Scientist To Watch Phil Baran describe the artistry of his research in drug discovery.

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image: Phil Baran: Molecule Magician

Phil Baran: Molecule Magician

By | February 1, 2014

Professor, Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute. Age: 36

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image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

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image: Tenacious Termites

Tenacious Termites

By | February 1, 2014

Formosan subterranean termites evade deadly pathogens by building nests lined with their own feces.

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image: The Necrobiome

The Necrobiome

By | February 1, 2014

Next-generation sequencing of the bacterial assemblages that inhabit a corpse throughout decomposition improve time-of-death estimates.

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image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.

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image: Inconsistent Evidence

Inconsistent Evidence

By | January 22, 2014

More than a third of US drug approvals are based on a single large clinical trial, while others require more in-depth study, according to a new report.

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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

By | January 15, 2014

Migratory locusts are less likely to aggregate into crop-devastating swarms when infected by the parasite Paranosema locustae.

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