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image: Farmer Fungi

Farmer Fungi

By | January 1, 2014

Researchers uncover an unprecedented relationship between morels and bacteria. But can it be called agriculture?

3 Comments

image: Renard's Menagerie

Renard's Menagerie

By | January 1, 2014

Some of the fantastical marine life depicted in a rare, 18th-century book

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image: tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

By | January 1, 2014

January 2014 Scientist to Watch Benjamin tenOever discusses his research.

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image: Test Scores Are in the Genes

Test Scores Are in the Genes

By | December 16, 2013

More than school or family environment, a child’s genetics influences high school exam results.

7 Comments

image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

1 Comment

image: Gender-based Citation Disparities

Gender-based Citation Disparities

By | December 12, 2013

An analysis reveals that papers with women as key authors are cited less often than those with men as key authors.

2 Comments

image: Fixing Protein Folding

Fixing Protein Folding

By | December 9, 2013

A small molecule that stabilizes a misfolded receptor can treat symptoms of a genetic mutation in mice, researchers show.

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image: Gut Microbes and Autism

Gut Microbes and Autism

By | December 9, 2013

Dosing mice modeling autism with a human gut bacterium reversed some disorder-associated behaviors in the animals.

3 Comments

image: Stinky Cheese

Stinky Cheese

By | December 2, 2013

Researchers collaborate to create fermented food products using microbes harvested from some malodorous parts of the human body.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2013

Tigers Forever, High Moon Over the Amazon, Earth from Space, and Medicine's Michelangelo

0 Comments

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