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image: The Necrobiome

The Necrobiome

By | February 1, 2014

Next-generation sequencing of the bacterial assemblages that inhabit a corpse throughout decomposition improve time-of-death estimates.

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image: Science Cartoonist Doesn’t Draw “Funny Style”

Science Cartoonist Doesn’t Draw “Funny Style”

By | January 31, 2014

Sidney Harris communicates science with minimal line work.

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image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.

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image: Review: “Green Porno”

Review: “Green Porno”

By | January 29, 2014

Isabella Rossellini explores nature’s kinky side in a one-woman show.

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image: Inconsistent Evidence

Inconsistent Evidence

By | January 22, 2014

More than a third of US drug approvals are based on a single large clinical trial, while others require more in-depth study, according to a new report.

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image: Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

By | January 16, 2014

A pair of one-act chamber operas takes the audience inside the world of imagined sound. 

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image: Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

By | January 15, 2014

Migratory locusts are less likely to aggregate into crop-devastating swarms when infected by the parasite Paranosema locustae.

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image: Group Aims for Biomarker Standards

Group Aims for Biomarker Standards

By | January 14, 2014

A new alliance between industry, academia, and the government wants to boost the “dismal” success rate of biomarker development.

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image: Microbes Expel Swarms of Vesicles

Microbes Expel Swarms of Vesicles

By | January 10, 2014

Scientists present the first evidence that marine cyanobacteria release vesicles—billions and billions of vesicles.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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