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image: AbbVie Wins Bidding War for Cancer Drugmaker

AbbVie Wins Bidding War for Cancer Drugmaker

By | March 5, 2015

The pharmaceutical firm beat out a host of potential suitors, Johnson & Johnson among them, to strike a $21 billion deal with Pharmacyclics.

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image: Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

By | March 5, 2015

Researchers engineer water nanostructures to wipe out pathogens that can spoil food and pose health risks.

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image: Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found

Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found

By | March 4, 2015

A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.

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image: Tough-to-Clean Equipment a Bigger Problem

Tough-to-Clean Equipment a Bigger Problem

By | March 2, 2015

The number of deaths attributable to certain medical probes may go beyond a recent outbreak in Los Angeles.

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image: A Deathly Pallor

A Deathly Pallor

By | March 1, 2015

Global warming could lead to lighter-colored insects with waning immune defenses.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Drunk Monkeys

Drunk Monkeys

By | March 1, 2015

UC Berkeley biologist Robert Dudley explains his "drunken monkey" hypothesis for how humans developed a taste for alcohol.

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image: Falling Out of the Family Tree

Falling Out of the Family Tree

By | March 1, 2015

A mutation in an ethanol-metabolizing enzyme arose around the time that arboreal primates shifted to a more terrestrial lifestyle, perhaps as an adaptation to eating fermented fruit.

1 Comment

image: Of Cells and Limits

Of Cells and Limits

By | March 1, 2015

Leonard Hayflick has been unafraid to speak his mind, whether it is to upend a well-entrenched dogma or to challenge the federal government. At 86, he’s nowhere near retirement.

3 Comments

image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

7 Comments

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