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image: Subway Microbiome Study Revised

Subway Microbiome Study Revised

By | August 4, 2015

Researchers tone down their highly publicized study that reported the presence of deadly pathogens on New York City subways.

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image: TB Traces

TB Traces

By | August 1, 2015

Take a trip to the mummy museum in Vác, Hungary, to see the human remains that helped researchers learn more about the origins of tuberculosis in Europe.

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image: Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

By | July 29, 2015

A US Army lab shipped live spores of the deadly bacterium because of improper irradiation protocols, a Department of Defense review has found.

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image: Teva Buys Allergan Generics for $40.5 Billion

Teva Buys Allergan Generics for $40.5 Billion

By | July 27, 2015

Meanwhile, Allergan acquires drug developer Naurex in a $560 million deal. 

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image: EMA Green Lights Malaria Vax

EMA Green Lights Malaria Vax

By | July 27, 2015

The European Medicines Agency endorses the first-ever malaria vaccine for use in children 6 weeks to 17 months old.

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image: Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

By | July 22, 2015

In some pathogenic bacteria, certain antibiotic resistance–associated mutations may also confer an unexpected growth advantage.

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image: HHS Partners on Ebola Drug

HHS Partners on Ebola Drug

By | July 22, 2015

The US Department of Health and Human Services will put nearly $20 million toward the development of an Ebola drug as Tekmira steps out of the space.

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image: Underground Immunity

Underground Immunity

By | July 16, 2015

Arabidopsis thaliana defense hormones shape the plant’s root microbiome. 

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image: Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>

Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff

By | July 14, 2015

Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.

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image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

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