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» drug development and microbiology

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image: Thwarting Persistence

Thwarting Persistence

By | November 13, 2013

Researchers show that activating an endogenous protease can eliminate bacterial persisters.

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image: Microbial Mediators

Microbial Mediators

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers show that symbiotic bacteria can help hyenas communicate with one another.

1 Comment

image: Astrogerm

Astrogerm

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers find a new bacterial species lurking in clean rooms used to assemble spacecraft at NASA and the European Space Agency.

2 Comments

image: Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers develop a strategy for rendering a toxic drug harmless—until it encounters a pair of enzymes that signals cancer cells are nearby.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2013

Tracks and Shadows, The Gap, The Cure in the Code, and An Appetite for Wonder

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | November 1, 2013

November 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Penetrating the Brain

Penetrating the Brain

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers use molecular keys, chisels, and crowbars to open the last great biochemical barricade in the body—the blood-brain barrier.

1 Comment

image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Company Size Won’t Predict Success

Company Size Won’t Predict Success

By | October 23, 2013

New analysis finds that the size of a company is not tied to getting a drug to market.

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image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

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