The Scientist

» drug development, immunology and evolution

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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image: Defeating the Virus

Defeating the Virus

By | May 1, 2015

Recent discoveries are spurring a renaissance in HIV vaccine research and development.

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image: Similar Strokes

Similar Strokes

By | April 29, 2015

Physics drove the convergent evolution of swimming in 22 unrelated marine species, a study suggests.

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image: RNA Ebola Drug Clears Animal Study

RNA Ebola Drug Clears Animal Study

By | April 24, 2015

The short interfering RNA-based therapy TKM-Ebola protects monkeys from the viral strain still circulating in West Africa.

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image: FDA Calls for Data on ALS Drug

FDA Calls for Data on ALS Drug

By | April 21, 2015

In the midst of a debate about an experimental drug’s early approval, the US Food and Drug Administration requests that full trial results be released.

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image: Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

By | April 17, 2015

A newly discovered protein promotes immunity to viruses and cancer by triggering the production of cytotoxic T cells.

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image: Citrus History

Citrus History

By | April 16, 2015

An analysis of 34 chloroplast genomes reveals how and when modern fruit varieties evolved from a common ancestor.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 8, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: ALS Drug Access Debated

ALS Drug Access Debated

By | April 7, 2015

Biotech company Genervon has requested accelerated approval for its experimental ALS drug after a small but promising Phase 2 trial. Patients advocate for its acceptance, while researchers urge caution.

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image: Studying Ebola Survivors

Studying Ebola Survivors

By | April 6, 2015

A scientist jumps at the chance to study the blood of four Ebola survivors to better understand how the immune system responds to the deadly virus. 

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