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Drug Approvals Up

By | December 7, 2012

The total number of new drugs approved this year ties last year for the highest since 2004, suggesting that the pharmaceutical industry is recovering.  

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image: NYU Still Recovering from Sandy

NYU Still Recovering from Sandy

By | December 7, 2012

NYU’s Langone Medical Center continues to struggle from the lasting impact of the 15-foot storm surge that accompanied the recent hurricane.

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The Scientist’s 2012 Geeky Gift Guide

By | December 6, 2012

Find the perfect present for the dedicated (or budding) scientists in your life

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Hurry Up, FDA

By | December 6, 2012

The US Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to get new devices on the market sooner—and antibiotics may be next.

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Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

By | December 6, 2012

Adipose tissue plays an immune role in individuals of normal wieght.

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Hand Signs for Science

By | December 5, 2012

Organizations are calling for a common set of sign language for scientific terms.

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Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

By | December 1, 2012

In the introduction to his latest book, renowned naturalist George Schaller describes the evolving role of the field biologist through the lens of his experiences with Himalayan wildlife.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

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