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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2012

May 2012's selection of notable quotes

8 Comments

image: Are Humans Still Evolving?

Are Humans Still Evolving?

By | April 30, 2012

Research on an 18th and 19th century Finnish population suggests that agriculture and monogamy may not have stopped human evolution.

46 Comments

image: Polar Bear More Ancient Than Realized

Polar Bear More Ancient Than Realized

By | April 20, 2012

A genetic analysis reveals that the polar bear split from the brown bear some 600,000 years ago.

0 Comments

image: New Target for Aspirin

New Target for Aspirin

By | April 20, 2012

New work on salicylate, a natural component of aspirin, suggests that activation of the energy-sensing AMP kinase may underlie some of aspirin’s health benefits.

6 Comments

image: Synthetic Genetic Evolution

Synthetic Genetic Evolution

By | April 19, 2012

Scientists show that manmade nucleic acids can replicate and evolve, ushering in a new era in synthetic biology.

22 Comments

image: An Antidote for Cocaine Overdose?

An Antidote for Cocaine Overdose?

By | April 19, 2012

A novel antibody with a powerful affinity for cocaine shows promise in reversing the deadly effects of an overdose.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

By | April 18, 2012

Introducing DELSA Global, a community initiative to connect experts, share data, and democratize science.

2 Comments

image: Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

By | April 18, 2012

Geography might explain the treasure trove of genetic diversity among Scots.

2 Comments

image: Repurpose Failed Drugs, NIH Urges

Repurpose Failed Drugs, NIH Urges

By | April 16, 2012

Francis Collins says pharmaceutical companies should help bridge the gap between basic science and applications with old drug compounds.

0 Comments

image: Monkeys “Read” Writing

Monkeys “Read” Writing

By | April 12, 2012

Baboons are able to distinguish printed English words from nonsense sequences of letters—the first step in the reading process.

0 Comments

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