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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | December 1, 2016

The importance of science innovation, publishing and gender, and more

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image: Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

By | December 1, 2016

Successful late-stage clinical trials could mark the maturation of a new drug development platform, but the path to commercialization is not without hurdles.

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image: 2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2016

These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.

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image: The Topography of Teeth

The Topography of Teeth

By | November 29, 2016

Intricate, digital maps of animals’ teeth, created using the same geographical tools used by mapmakers, may help researchers determine the diets of extinct species.

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image: Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

By , , and | November 18, 2016

A combination of the traditional metric and the newer h5 index potentiates the scientific community toward more-balanced evaluation. 

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image: Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

By | November 9, 2016

Natural selection may be behind the dearth of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans.

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image: Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

By | November 7, 2016

A mutation that appeared early in the 2014 outbreak made the virus more infectious in humans, scientists show.

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image: New Support for Experimental Alzheimer’s Drug

New Support for Experimental Alzheimer’s Drug

By | November 2, 2016

Merck’s verubecestat, which is currently being tested in two Phase 3 studies, is safe, according to newly published Phase 1 data.

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image: 2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2016

Most researchers feel stimulated by their work but are dissatisfied with their compensation, according to this year’s results.

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