The Scientist

» drug development and culture

Most Recent

image: Renard's Menagerie

Renard's Menagerie

By | January 1, 2014

Some of the fantastical marine life depicted in a rare, 18th-century book

0 Comments

image: Test Scores Are in the Genes

Test Scores Are in the Genes

By | December 16, 2013

More than school or family environment, a child’s genetics influences high school exam results.

7 Comments

image: Gender-based Citation Disparities

Gender-based Citation Disparities

By | December 12, 2013

An analysis reveals that papers with women as key authors are cited less often than those with men as key authors.

2 Comments

image: Fixing Protein Folding

Fixing Protein Folding

By | December 9, 2013

A small molecule that stabilizes a misfolded receptor can treat symptoms of a genetic mutation in mice, researchers show.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2013

Tigers Forever, High Moon Over the Amazon, Earth from Space, and Medicine's Michelangelo

0 Comments

image: Karmella Haynes - Artist

Karmella Haynes - Artist

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's Scientist to Watch is also an accomplished painter.

0 Comments

image: Weathering the Storm

Weathering the Storm

By | December 1, 2013

How to prepare your lab for natural disasters and cope with unavoidable consequences

1 Comment

image: Review: <em>The Origin of Species</em>

Review: The Origin of Species

By | November 22, 2013

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute this week released three short films to teach students about evolution and speciation.

4 Comments

image: Don’t Fear DIYbio

Don’t Fear DIYbio

By | November 19, 2013

Biological tinkerers are not the risk that some have made them out to be, according to a new report.

0 Comments

image: Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers develop a strategy for rendering a toxic drug harmless—until it encounters a pair of enzymes that signals cancer cells are nearby.

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS