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image: How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

By | March 1, 2012

A lot changes in a child’s body over the course of development, and not all changes occur linearly: gene expression can fluctuate, and organs can perform different functions on the way to their final purpose in the body. Here are some of the key deve

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image: How the Pediatric Laws Work

How the Pediatric Laws Work

By | March 1, 2012

The Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) of 2003 requires that companies developing new drugs that could be used to treat a condition in children perform clinical trials in kids before winning FDA approval. 

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image: Child-Proofing Drugs

Child-Proofing Drugs

By | March 1, 2012

When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.

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image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

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image: Promoting Death

Promoting Death

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in biochemistry

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image: The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

By | March 1, 2012

The first electron microscope to peer into an intact cell ushers in the new field of cell biology.

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image: Ovarian Stem Cells in Humans?

Ovarian Stem Cells in Humans?

By | February 27, 2012

Adult human ovaries contain a population of stem cells capable of generating immature egg cells.

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image: Cancer Researcher Sued Again

Cancer Researcher Sued Again

By | February 27, 2012

UPenn has filed suit against the president of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center for failing to share intellectual property he developed while at the university.

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image: New Kind of Cellular Suicide

New Kind of Cellular Suicide

By | February 23, 2012

Researchers identify a gene that drives a type of cellular suicide that differs from the more commonly observed apoptosis phenomenon.

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image: Long Live the Y

Long Live the Y

By | February 22, 2012

Despite suggestions to the contrary, the Y chromosome is not necessarily rotting away.

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Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences