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image: Opinion: Improving FDA Evaluations Without Jeopardizing Safety and Efficacy

Opinion: Improving FDA Evaluations Without Jeopardizing Safety and Efficacy

By | February 1, 2017

What can be done to lower development costs and drug prices?

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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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image: Infographic: The Cost of Drug Development

Infographic: The Cost of Drug Development

By | February 1, 2017

Expensive clinical trials and few drug approvals can drive up drug prices for consumers.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Pitcher Plant Enzymes Digest Gluten in Mouse Model

Pitcher Plant Enzymes Digest Gluten in Mouse Model

By | February 1, 2017

A newly discovered protease could break down grain proteins that trigger celiac disease.

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image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

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image: Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

By | February 1, 2017

See how different environmental conditions affect the activity of a molecule sensitive to both light and temperature.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

6 Comments

image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

5 Comments

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