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image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Group Aims for Biomarker Standards

Group Aims for Biomarker Standards

By | January 14, 2014

A new alliance between industry, academia, and the government wants to boost the “dismal” success rate of biomarker development.

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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

By | December 17, 2013

Water samples collected from natural gas extraction sites in Colorado contain hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to birth defects, infertility, and cancer.

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image: Fixing Protein Folding

Fixing Protein Folding

By | December 9, 2013

A small molecule that stabilizes a misfolded receptor can treat symptoms of a genetic mutation in mice, researchers show.

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image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.

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image: Waiting in the Wings

Waiting in the Wings

By | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

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image: Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

By | November 26, 2013

The state assembles a task force to try to slow the growth of burgeoning populations of the ecologically destructive invasive species.

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image: Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers develop a strategy for rendering a toxic drug harmless—until it encounters a pair of enzymes that signals cancer cells are nearby.

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