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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

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image: Bird Bullies

Bird Bullies

By | June 1, 2013

Regular supplies of food for scavenger birds in Spain may not be the most effective conservation strategy, as smaller birds are bullied away.

1 Comment

image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

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image: Piece by Piece

Piece by Piece

By | June 1, 2013

A guide to fragment-based drug discovery

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image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

2 Comments

image: Modified Toxin to Treat Obesity?

Modified Toxin to Treat Obesity?

By | May 29, 2013

Researchers show that a synthetic peptide derived from a sea anemone toxin has potent weight-regulating effects in a mouse model of obesity.  

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image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

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image: Vitamin C Slays TB Bacteria

Vitamin C Slays TB Bacteria

By | May 21, 2013

The essential nutrient can kill drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by producing oxidative radicals that damage DNA.

1 Comment

image: Nano-vehicles for Cancer Drugs

Nano-vehicles for Cancer Drugs

By | May 20, 2013

Experimental cancer therapeutics delivered to tumors via nanoparticles could provide a safer and more effective therapy than conventional chemotherapy.

1 Comment

image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

4 Comments

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