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image: Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

By | June 1, 2017

In mice, cells in the prefrontal cortex—where memories are maintained long-term—start to encode a fearful experience right from the start.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: The Search for Methods to Monitor Brain Cooling

The Search for Methods to Monitor Brain Cooling

By | June 1, 2017

Newborns deprived of oxygen have their temperatures lowered to protect against brain damage, but it’s hard to decipher the babies’ immediate response to the intervention.

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image: Brain Freeze

Brain Freeze

By | June 1, 2017

Meet one child saved from brain damage by cooling therapy.

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image: Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

By | June 1, 2017

Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.

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Synaptic connections and a new neuron type emerge in high-res images, which hold promise for mapping the complete connectome.

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The Stanford University psychiatrist and neuroscientist known for his contributions to optogenetics and tissue clearing is awarded €4 million by the Fresenius Research Prize.

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image: Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

By | May 26, 2017

Inducing activity in the zona incerta region of the brain prompts mice to gorge themselves.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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