The Scientist

» drug development and evolution

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: Lazarus Drugs

Lazarus Drugs

By | February 1, 2015

While some drugs sail through development, others suffer setbacks, including FDA rejections, before reaching the market.  

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image: Screening Goes In Silico

Screening Goes In Silico

By | February 1, 2015

Computational tools take some of the cost—and guesswork—out of drug discovery.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

By | January 29, 2015

A mass migration of mobile regulatory elements increased the expression of thousands of genes in the uterus during the evolution of pregnancy.

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image: Drug Stimulates Brown Fat

Drug Stimulates Brown Fat

By | January 28, 2015

A small study finds that an approved medication increases metabolic rate and the activity of thermogenic brown fat in men.

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image: America’s First Pooches

America’s First Pooches

By | January 27, 2015

Study of ancient dog DNA sheds light on early Americans’ relationships with their pets.

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image: Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

By | January 21, 2015

A point mutation analysis of the entire human genome finds that alterations to as many as 7.5 percent of nucleotides may have contributed to humans’ evolutionary split from chimpanzees.

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image: Tracking Tuberculosis Over Time

Tracking Tuberculosis Over Time

By | January 19, 2015

Genomic analysis of a multidrug-resistant lineage pinpoints historical correlations with human events.

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image: IOM Urges Data Sharing

IOM Urges Data Sharing

By | January 15, 2015

The Institute of Medicine says results from human clinical trials ought to be made available to independent researchers within 18 months.

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