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image: What’s in a Voice?

What’s in a Voice?

By | May 1, 2016

More than you think (or could make use of)

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image: Another Fatal-Disease Drug in Limbo

Another Fatal-Disease Drug in Limbo

By | April 26, 2016

A federal advisory panel votes against Sarepta Therapeutics’s treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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image: First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy

First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy

By | April 25, 2016

A biotech company reports that an experimental treatment elongated its CEO’s telomeres. 

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The massive rock that smashed into Earth 66 million years ago killed off many dinosaur species, but the animals were in steady decline for millennia before the cataclysm, researchers report.

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image: Tracking Zika’s Evolution

Tracking Zika’s Evolution

By | April 15, 2016

Sequence analysis of 41 viral strains reveals more than a half-century of change. 

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image: Lightning-Fast Spider Bites

Lightning-Fast Spider Bites

By | April 8, 2016

Trap-jaw spiders have the fastest, most powerful bite of any arachnid, scientists show. 

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image: Zooming In on an Antidepressant Target

Zooming In on an Antidepressant Target

By | April 6, 2016

Structural studies reveal how SSRI drugs bind to the human serotonin transporter.

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image: Accomplished Biophysicist Dies

Accomplished Biophysicist Dies

By | April 5, 2016

Harold Morowitz, who dedicated his career to investigating the origins of life, has passed away at age 88.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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image: Another Drug Price Hike

Another Drug Price Hike

By | March 28, 2016

Valeant Pharmaceuticals is criticized for jacking up the price of a drug used in assisted suicide.

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