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image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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image: The Age of Pharmabrewing

The Age of Pharmabrewing

By | January 1, 2016

We should not resist developing opiate-producing GM yeast for fear of the technology falling into the wrong hands.

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image: RNA Methylation Dynamics

RNA Methylation Dynamics

By , and | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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image: Viral Soldiers

Viral Soldiers

By | January 1, 2016

Phage therapy to combat bacterial infections is garnering attention for the second time in 100 years, but solid clinical support for its widespread use is still lacking.

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image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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image: Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

By | December 23, 2015

As the rhythmic expression of many genes falls out of sync in older human brains, a subset of transcripts gain rhythmicity with age.

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image: GM Calves Move to University

GM Calves Move to University

By | December 21, 2015

The first two bulls genetically engineered to lack horns arrived at the University of California, Davis, for breeding.

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image: Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

By | December 21, 2015

The selection of traits suitable for human companionship may have dragged along some unfavorable alleles.

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image: Year in Review: CRISPR Blossoms

Year in Review: CRISPR Blossoms

By | December 16, 2015

As researchers work to improve the precision gene-editing technology, the community discusses the best way to use it.

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image: Constant Evolution

Constant Evolution

By | December 16, 2015

Bacteria growing in an unchanging environment continue to adapt indefinitely.

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