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image: Inconsistent Evidence

Inconsistent Evidence

By | January 22, 2014

More than a third of US drug approvals are based on a single large clinical trial, while others require more in-depth study, according to a new report.

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image: Group Aims for Biomarker Standards

Group Aims for Biomarker Standards

By | January 14, 2014

A new alliance between industry, academia, and the government wants to boost the “dismal” success rate of biomarker development.

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image: Fixing Protein Folding

Fixing Protein Folding

By | December 9, 2013

A small molecule that stabilizes a misfolded receptor can treat symptoms of a genetic mutation in mice, researchers show.

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image: Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers develop a strategy for rendering a toxic drug harmless—until it encounters a pair of enzymes that signals cancer cells are nearby.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2013

Tracks and Shadows, The Gap, The Cure in the Code, and An Appetite for Wonder

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | November 1, 2013

November 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Penetrating the Brain

Penetrating the Brain

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers use molecular keys, chisels, and crowbars to open the last great biochemical barricade in the body—the blood-brain barrier.

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image: Company Size Won’t Predict Success

Company Size Won’t Predict Success

By | October 23, 2013

New analysis finds that the size of a company is not tied to getting a drug to market.

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image: A New Antibiotic?

A New Antibiotic?

By | October 16, 2013

Scientists show that peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers can effectively silence essential bacterial genes.

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image: Centipede Venom Tops Morphine

Centipede Venom Tops Morphine

By | October 1, 2013

The substance targets the same ion channel that's mutated in people who don't feel pain.

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