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image: Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>

Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff

By | July 14, 2015

Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.

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image: Small Genetic Change Yields Edible Corn

Small Genetic Change Yields Edible Corn

By | July 13, 2015

Researchers attributed corn’s soft, edible casing to a single DNA base swap in its ancestor’s genome.


image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Faith vs. Fact</em>

Book Excerpt from Faith vs. Fact

By | July 1, 2015

In Chapter 1, “The Problem,” author Jerry Coyne sets the historical stage for his suggestion that science and religion are not compatible and never will be.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone


image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.


image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes


image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: Staying Active in the Lab

Staying Active in the Lab

By | July 1, 2015

Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.


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