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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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image: Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

By | October 1, 2016

Photon emissions in the brain are red-shifted in more-intelligent species, though scientists dispute what that means.

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image: Bird Brains Have Numerous Neurons

Bird Brains Have Numerous Neurons

By | June 14, 2016

Many avian species have more neurons than do mammals with similar-mass brains.

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In the book's prologue, author Frans de Waal considers the intellectual impediments to studying animal intelligence.

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image: To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

By | May 1, 2016

The study of nonhuman intelligence is coming into its own as researchers realize the unique contexts in which distinct species learn and behave.

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image: Brain Activity Identifies Individuals

Brain Activity Identifies Individuals

By | October 12, 2015

Neural connectome patterns differ enough between people to use them as a fingerprint.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2015

February 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: How Dogs Interpret Speech

How Dogs Interpret Speech

By | December 2, 2014

Dogs tend to turn to the left when they hear emotional speech-like sounds, and right when they hear verbal commands from a robot.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2014

August 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Week in Review: July 7–11

Week in Review: July 7–11

By | July 11, 2014

Assessing mtDNA mutations among healthy people; heritability of intelligence; epigenetic inheritance of maternal malnutrition markers; consumers buy into DNA ancestry

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