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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Disclosure of Problematic Scopes Delayed: Report

Disclosure of Problematic Scopes Delayed: Report

By | January 14, 2016

The US Senate has found hospitals, a device maker, and federal regulators dragged their feet on reporting contaminated endoscopes.

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image: Picking Up the Pace

Picking Up the Pace

By | January 1, 2016

FDA designations promise to expedite the approval of drugs for conditions ranging from infectious disease to cancer.

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image: Diagnostics Group Refutes FDA’s Concerns

Diagnostics Group Refutes FDA’s Concerns

By | December 17, 2015

The Association for Molecular Pathology finds fault in the agency’s report on safety issues associated with certain lab tests.

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image: Drug Produced in GM Chicken Approved

Drug Produced in GM Chicken Approved

By | December 10, 2015

The US Food and Drug Administration greenlights a rare-disease drug that is produced in the eggs of genetically modified chickens.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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