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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: FDA Considers Three-Way Babies

FDA Considers Three-Way Babies

By | February 26, 2014

The agency is soliciting opinions on a new technology that has the potential to circumvent mitochondrial diseases by producing embryos using DNA from three people.

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image: Opinion: Translational Biotechnology

Opinion: Translational Biotechnology

By | February 17, 2014

Regulators must consider both the promise and potential pitfalls of new technologies when determining whether to move them into clinical trials.

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image: Week in Review: February 10–14

Week in Review: February 10–14

By | February 14, 2014

First Ancient North American genome; cannabinoids connect hunger with olfaction and eating; biotechs explore crowdfunding; confronting creationism

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image: Opinion: Confronting Creationism

Opinion: Confronting Creationism

By | February 7, 2014

Five reasons why scientists should stay out of debates over evolution.

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

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image: Stem Cell Lines Not Fit for Clinic

Stem Cell Lines Not Fit for Clinic

By | February 6, 2014

Most stem cell lines registered with the NIH don’t comply with the FDA’s guidelines for human use, according to a new report.  

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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