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image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

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image: Clinic Trial Problems Kept Mum

Clinic Trial Problems Kept Mum

By | February 11, 2015

Despite documented dysfunction in a number of studies, rarely do those problems get a mention in the resulting publications, according to a new study.

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image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

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image: FDA Head Leaving Post

FDA Head Leaving Post

By | February 6, 2015

US Food and Drug Administration commissioner Margaret Hamburg is stepping down after six years on the job.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: Lazarus Drugs

Lazarus Drugs

By | February 1, 2015

While some drugs sail through development, others suffer setbacks, including FDA rejections, before reaching the market.  

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

By | January 29, 2015

A mass migration of mobile regulatory elements increased the expression of thousands of genes in the uterus during the evolution of pregnancy.

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image: America’s First Pooches

America’s First Pooches

By | January 27, 2015

Study of ancient dog DNA sheds light on early Americans’ relationships with their pets.

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image: Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

By | January 21, 2015

A point mutation analysis of the entire human genome finds that alterations to as many as 7.5 percent of nucleotides may have contributed to humans’ evolutionary split from chimpanzees.

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