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Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

2 Comments

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Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

0 Comments

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Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

2 Comments

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Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

0 Comments

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That Loving Feeling

By | July 1, 2014

There are no FDA-approved drugs to treat low sexual desire in women, but not for lack of trying.

1 Comment

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The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

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Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

1 Comment

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Omnivore Ancestors?

By | June 26, 2014

Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat and vegetables.

0 Comments

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FDA Issues Nanotechnology Guidance

By | June 26, 2014

Four new documents from the US Food and Drug Administration provide industry with guidelines on the use of nanotechnology in products regulated by the agency.

0 Comments

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Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

By | June 25, 2014

E. coli repeatedly exposed to ampicillin adapt to stay dormant for longer periods of time—just long enough to outlast the antibiotic treatment.

1 Comment

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