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Inherited Intelligence

By | July 10, 2014

Cognitive testing in chimpanzee pedigrees reveals a genetic basis for intelligence.

4 Comments

image: Smallpox Vials Found in FDA Storage

Smallpox Vials Found in FDA Storage

By | July 8, 2014

Employees packing up an old storage unit run by the US Food and Drug Administration uncovered 16 forgotten vials of smallpox.

0 Comments

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Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

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The Rise of Color

By | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

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Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

2 Comments

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Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

0 Comments

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Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

2 Comments

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Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

0 Comments

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That Loving Feeling

By | July 1, 2014

There are no FDA-approved drugs to treat low sexual desire in women, but not for lack of trying.

1 Comment

image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

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